PFS Guidance: Briefs and Reports

Brief

Ending Family Homelessness

The number of American families that are, or are at risk of becoming, homeless or housing insecure remains stubbornly high. The problem persists, not due to lack of solutions, but for two primary reasons: political will and artificial budget divisions. The pay for success (PFS) model for financing public services offers an opportunity for state and local governments to help overcome these hurdles. This paper considers this potential.

Report

More Than Cost Savings

A popular benefit of the pay for success (PFS) model is its potential to finance programs that, if successful, will save governments more than they cost. But in practice, this limits the number of programs eligible for PFS. It also incorrectly assumes that most governments place little value on the non-fiscal benefits. With this reality in mind, this paper outlines a holistic framework that integrates potential fiscal and non-fiscal benefits, providing policymakers with clear and simple criteria when considering PFS projects.

Brief

Results-Based Financing Approaches:Observations for Pay for Success from International Experiences

Globally, policymakers and the public are searching for solutions to help ensure money meant for public service delivery goes to fund effective programs. One such solution, results-based financing (RBF), leverages existing or new financial resources to incentivize results by paying for desired outcomes or outputs. RBF approaches are diverse and have emerged in different contexts and with different partners. Generally, however, they share two characteristics: payment is based on results and the relationship between payment and results is predefined.

Report

Pay for Success Project Assessment Tool

The PFS Project Assessment Tool (PAT) helps people answer a fundamental question: What makes for a strong PFS project? It describes core elements of PFS projects, explains why those elements are important, provides a scoring system to help distinguish the strengths and weaknesses of a proposed project, and generates recommendations for improving those weak areas. The PAT is designed for individuals, governments, and organizations working through PFS projects or, even earlier on, simply considering engagement with PFS.