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Future of PFS: Local realities shape evaluations of PFS projects

In pay for success (PFS) projects, it’s important to use the most rigorous evaluation design possible to determine which programs work and to build the evidence base around what works. With that said, however, the project’s evaluation designs are influenced by the characteristics of the program being offered and the local realities around implementing that program, such as the availability of data and the number
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Future of PFS: Three challenges to making PFS more attractive to service providers

Providers of social services often grapple with a disconnect between the impact they want to have and the funding they have available to make it happen. The pay for success (PFS) model is a potential remedy but, as we heard at the Urban Institute’s national symposium on PFS, the model itself poses challenges for providers.
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Future of PFS: Partnering for success

While the focus in pay for success (PFS) is, understandably, on outcomes for vulnerable populations, there is tremendous value in the very process of developing a project. 
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Future of PFS: Bringing rate cards to the United States

Evaluation matters in pay for success (PFS) projects. Evaluation results not only determine whether or not investors are repaid, they can also contribute to the evidence base of the intervention and can give us a better sense of what works.
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Future of PFS: Reorienting government to achieve systems change

The standard way of delivering public services is broken. Currently, governments pay for outputs, such as nightly beds for homeless individuals staying in shelters. But what the public, service providers, homeless individuals, and other stakeholders really care about are long-term outcomes: Do individuals experiencing homelessness secure stable housing and employment as a result of services? Are they able to avoid unnecessary hospitalizations or involvement with the criminal justice system?