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Three tools for applying pay for success to the criminal justice system

You don’t have to look hard to see that America has an incarceration problem. According to BJS, in 2015 1 in 37 or about 2.7 percent of adults in the US were behind bars or under correctional supervision. Incarcerating so many people has negative consequences not only for the people who are detained, but also for their families and communities.
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What PFS investors and governments have in common – and where they are (surprisingly) different

Given the significant challenges associated with pay for success (PFS) projects, it is natural to question why jurisdictions and organizations choose to do pay for success.
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Future of PFS: What happens if PFS evaluations don’t include counterfactuals?

How important is it to conduct an evaluation that includes a strong counterfactual? The rudimentary medical practice of bloodletting helps answer that question. 
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Exciting progress shown in early results for Denver PFS project

The first results for the Denver Supporting Housing Social Impact Bond Initiative were announced today. This PFS project, led by the city of Denver, the Corporation for Supportive Housing, Enterprise Community Partners, the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, and the Mental Health Center of Denver, provides people who are chronically homeless with a permanent supportive housing intervention. The promising results have led to the first “success payment” for the project’s investors.
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Why pay for success projects can take so long (and why they’re worth it)

Typically, pay for success (PFS) projects take a year or more just to launch, and another four to seven years for implementation and evaluation.