Blog

The Social Innovation Fund's PFS investment: Partnerships by the numbers

We’ve written quite a bit about preparing for pay for success (PFS) projects; from understanding the program evidence base, to pricing outcomes, to the importance of rigorous evaluation design. But at the heart of any successful PFS planning activity are productive public-private partnerships.  These partnerships can be complicated. 
Blog

Using hypothetical projects to talk about evidence

How does evidence shape how stakeholders perceive the risks and benefits of pay for success (PFS) projects? Last Friday, the centrality of evidence to each stakeholder perspective was on display at “Pay for Success and Social Impact Finance 2.0,” a day long convening of students and experts hosted by the University of Virginia’s Pay for Success Lab.
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Ramp-up periods in pay for success projects

We have often been asked in our training and technical assistance (TTA) work to explain the value of including a pilot or ramp-up period in a pay for success (PFS) project. Pilots and ramp-ups serve very similar functions: both are trial runs of the project during which success or failure does not affect outcome payments, allowing the service provider and the intermediary the flexibility to address potential issues that may affect the overall success of the project.
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Making sound cost decisions in pay for success

What costs should you consider in establishing a pay for success (PFS) project? How should success payment rates be established? Who bears responsibility for which costs? How can a government protect itself from being stuck with excessive costs?  What cost information is likely to be needed in determining what action to take after the project has ended?
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Balancing the potential and risks of pay for success

This is the second of a two-part blog series considering criticisms of pay for success (PFS). This series builds on an opinion piece written by our Initiative’s co-director, Justin Milner, which addressed four of the most common criticisms of PFS.