Blog

Procurement in the Connecticut Family Stability Project

Pay for success (PFS) encourages governments to shift from paying for outputs to paying for outcomes. This change may affect how governments approaches procurement, including defining services, selecting providers, and establishing the terms that define relationships. Our new paper provides government stakeholders interested in PFS with important lessons on how a strong procurement process can improve PFS projects.
Blog

Can investors open the door to end family homelessness?

Each year approximately 150,000 families with 330,000 children turn to homeless shelters during a housing crisis. That's a shameful number of children without a place to sleep at night. But as we detail in a new report, data show that this problem is solvable.
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Future of PFS: Local realities shape evaluations of PFS projects

In pay for success (PFS) projects, it’s important to use the most rigorous evaluation design possible to determine which programs work and to build the evidence base around what works. With that said, however, the project’s evaluation designs are influenced by the characteristics of the program being offered and the local realities around implementing that program, such as the availability of data and the number
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Future of PFS: Three challenges to making PFS more attractive to service providers

Providers of social services often grapple with a disconnect between the impact they want to have and the funding they have available to make it happen. The pay for success (PFS) model is a potential remedy but, as we heard at the Urban Institute’s national symposium on PFS, the model itself poses challenges for providers.
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Future of PFS: Partnering for success

While the focus in pay for success (PFS) is, understandably, on outcomes for vulnerable populations, there is tremendous value in the very process of developing a project.