Blog

Urban announces third competition for pay for success administrative data technical assistance

The Urban Institute is pleased to announce it is releasing a new Notice of Service Availability (NoSA) to select up to four additional sites to receive pro bono technical assistance through the Pay for Success – Administrative Data (PFS-AD) program. The PFS-AD program is supported by a grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS).
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The fundamental role of evidence in pay for success

Social science is all about evidence building. When a social program delivers services to improve outcomes for a population, researchers evaluate how well that intervention accomplishes these predetermined goals. Over time, testing hypotheses through evaluation builds bodies of evidence that can improve future service delivery. In pay for success (PFS), a strong evidence base contributes to the development of projects in three major ways: it guides PFS project scoping, informs PFS program selection, and influences the terms of the deal.
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Can pay for success help reduce the number of people with mental illnesses in jail?

According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, 44 percent of people in jail have a history of mental health disorders [1] and roughly 2 million people with serious mental illnesses are booked into jails across the United States each year.
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Exciting interim results show Denver’s supportive housing social impact bond is paying off

Less than two years into the Denver Supportive Housing Social Impact Bond (SIB)—a five-year project that provides affordable housing and wraparound services to support people experiencing chronic homelessness and cycling in and out of jail—the initiative is paying off for the City of Denver, homeless residents, and investors.
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Can pay for success be a tool to fight blighted properties?

Cities of all sizes and geographies across the United States are struggling with vacant and abandoned homes. Whether driven by the more recent 2008 housing market crash or longer term economic restructuring in older, industrial “legacy cities,” cities across the United States are struggling to address the economic and social costs associated with vacant and abandoned homes. Pay for success (PFS) has the potential to finance physical social infrastructure projects, and it may be a tool to tackle the issue of blight as well.