Blog

Pay for Success offers support for unemployed veterans with PTSD

Twenty percent of America’s 20.4 million veterans suffer from either major depression or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), yet only about half seek treatment, and the ones who do have limited access to high-quality care. Some may be unaware of the services available to them, while others may require help navigating the federal and local systems to receive services.
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What role do intermediaries play in pay for success?

Intermediaries are one of the key stakeholders in a pay for success (PFS) project. Across current and developing PFS projects, two types of intermediaries exist: financial intermediaries and knowledge intermediaries.
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Delaware becomes tenth state to enact PFS legislation

In response to growing interest in pay for success (PFS) in the United States in recent years, states have enacted legislation to authorize or appropriate funds to be used in PFS projects. At least 20 states plus the District of Columbia have introduced PFS-related legislation, and of those, nine states have adopted such legislation. In August this year, Delaware became the tenth state to pass PFS legislation when Governor John Carney signed Senate Bill 242.
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An antidote to the “wrong pockets” problem?

One of the biggest barriers to redirecting funds is the “wrong pockets” problem. This problem arises when one organization or sector is best placed to invest in achieving an outcome, but another sector or organization would benefit financially from the investment. We could take several steps to help address this significant obstacle to redirecting funds that would improve health. Among them, budget process incentives designed to encourage more braiding and blending of funds seem likely to be the most effective. The key step is to revamp budgeting and payment rules to overcome the perverse wrong pocket incentives. With different rules, cross-sector investment becomes more feasible.
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Integrated funding streams across the health and human services continuum

Health and human services agencies aim to support families and protect children. People that receive health and human services (H/HS)—such as Medicaid, child welfare, cash assistance (TANF), “food stamps” (SNAP), and child care—face challenges with multiple root causes. To successfully address these root issues, it is important to bridge programmatic H/HS siloes. Program and agency integration promotes multi-faceted solutions for individuals and families and is anchored in seamless information exchanges, which facilitate coordinated care delivery, efficiency, and holistic payment models that reward outcomes rather than inputs.