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The role of data in pay for success and early childhood education

Collecting reliable and informative data is an important part of any pay for success (PFS) project. Data can inform whether a PFS project is feasible, who should be served, what outcomes are most appropriate, and how the evaluation should be carried out – and, at its conclusion, whether a project is successful in achieving its target outcomes.
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The state of the science in early childhood education interventions and pay for success

Early childhood education (ECE) programs, such as high-quality preschool and pre-kindergarten, can make a big difference in children’s lives, even after the programs themselves are over. Because of their long-term benefits, ECE programs are generating a lot of interest in the pay for success (PFS) field. Of the 11 PFS projects already launched, two are scaling evidence-based ECE programs, and even more are in the works.
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Using pay for success to fund early childhood education

The first few years of life are critical for healthy development, but too many children do not receive the early care and experiences that benefit them in the short run and later in life. Evidence tells us that high-quality early childhood education (ECE) programs like preschool can help all children develop into healthy adolescents and adults.
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Pay for success and systems thinking

“We are living in a complex, fast-changing world.” “It’s time to break down the silos.”These are messages being heard across the social sector, and they’ve forced a reexamination of how we think about and tackle social issues. Systems thinking, a way of thinking and working used to examine and address the root causes of complex social problems, offers one way to wrangle with this complexity and collaborate more effectively by breaking down silos that prevent systems change.
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Principles for selecting PFS outcome metrics

When designing a new pay for success (PFS) project, one of the most important steps is selecting the outcome metrics by which the project will define success. In other words, what social impact do we want to see as a result of this program, and how will it be measured? This is a strategic decision-making question with clear value beyond just PFS projects. Well-defined outcomes help answer: Why are we implementing this intervention? What, specifically, do we hope to achieve?